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So now it (May be) about one Canadian farmer having the capacity in acreage to farm equivalent to many, many British farmers. Isn’t this how the Milk Marketing Board and other farming cooperatives came into being? Problem is, in an effort to make milk as cheap as possible to the supermarkets, they’re squeezing fuck out of the farmer.

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Maggie did this with the coal. 

I believe the mining communities of northern England were very understanding about it all.

It could be an isolated incident, but if other bread makers are thinking of doing the same it could be a bad day at the office for Farming UK (Best in the world)

On the plus side, we've got to build all these new houses somewhere, and redundant arable land is perfect for that.

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7 minutes ago, MickyD said:

So now it (May be) about one Canadian farmer having the capacity in acreage to farm equivalent to many, many British farmers. Isn’t this how the Milk Marketing Board and other farming cooperatives came into being? Problem is, in an effort to make milk as cheap as possible to the supermarkets, they’re squeezing fuck out of the farmer.

Yep.

Looking at that statement from warbies, they're already paying above the basic wheat price, so long as they can get a product that meets certain specifications.

Maybe now, they can't afford to do that. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Spider said:

They also feed beefburgers to swans.

Chickens, swans, a partridge.

Edited by Mannyroader

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1 minute ago, Spider said:

Maggie did this with the coal. 

I believe the mining communities of northern England were very understanding about it all.

It could be an isolated incident, but if other bread makers are thinking of doing the same it could be a bad day at the office for Farming UK (Best in the world)

On the plus side, we've got to build all these new houses somewhere, and redundant arable land is perfect for that.

Advocating reducing immigration?

Absolutely 👍.

It is important to remember, that environmental problems are expected to hit food production in places like India etc in the not to distant future.

Exports from many places to Europe could be badly hit and as such having more land of our own available to grow our own will be vital.

Meat consumption is also likely to drop a bit as the diet becomes a bit more plant based.

Wheat producers could we'll see an opportunity to diversify anyhow.

 

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1 minute ago, Tonge moor green jacket said:

Advocating reducing immigration?

Absolutely 👍.

It is important to remember, that environmental problems are expected to hit food production in places like India etc in the not to distant future.

Exports from many places to Europe could be badly hit and as such having more land of our own available to grow our own will be vital.

Meat consumption is also likely to drop a bit as the diet becomes a bit more plant based.

Wheat producers could we'll see an opportunity to diversify anyhow.

 

Immigration means nowt to me. I like diversity and spicy food anyway.

I'd rather import from America than ChiNAH

 

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4 minutes ago, Spider said:

Immigration means nowt to me. I like diversity and spicy food anyway.

I'd rather import from America than ChiNAH

 

So why the flippancy if it means nowt to you?

Personally, I'd rather import from Canada than America, but that's a minor point.

You've scratched the surface of what is arguably going to become the biggest issue of the coming generation of two: food.

Farmers for their part are going to have to be flexible and potentially modernise their practices, meanwhile as consumers we are going t have to modify our habits. 

We will have to become far less wasteful, and have a better relationship with producers, which may mean paying more for quality stuff on our plates- so long as it finds its way to producers 

 

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Those pesky UK farmers blockading Stanlow oil refinery in 2000 causing a petrol shortage, i wonder if Warbies get the same treatment ?

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2 minutes ago, Tonge moor green jacket said:

So why the flippancy if it means nowt to you?

Personally, I'd rather import from Canada than America, but that's a minor point.

You've scratched the surface of what is arguably going to become the biggest issue of the coming generation of two: food.

Farmers for their part are going to have to be flexible and potentially modernise their practices, meanwhile as consumers we are going t have to modify our habits. 

We will have to become far less wasteful, and have a better relationship with producers, which may mean paying more for quality stuff on our plates- so long as it finds its way to producers 

 

My original point really was that Britain's biggest breadmaker (I think) are going abroad for a product that's being grown a few miles from the bakery.

I'm guessing here and can't be bothered looking, but I'd be surprised if Brexit & tariffs being lifted don't have some sort of influence over their decision. If I'm wrong, then fair enough.

I just thought Brexit was supposed to put British farming/fishing/manufacturing in first place.

It's possibly a one off, but where a big set up like Warbies lead, others tend to follow.

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Warbies bread is shit.

Their tatty cakes & crumpets are good though.

Carry on.... 

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Dunno, I like a white toastie loaf for bacon butties.

Now Kingsmill, that's a pile of shit.

 

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I also prefer a warbys white for bacon butties. Small independent bakers’ white uncut loaves taste miles better on the day of purchase but are fucked in a very short time period. Warbys, on the other hand, manage to produce a loaf that’s still good a couple of days after the bbe date.

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5 minutes ago, Spider said:

My original point really was that Britain's biggest breadmaker (I think) are going abroad for a product that's being grown a few miles from the bakery.

I'm guessing here and can't be bothered looking, but I'd be surprised if Brexit & tariffs being lifted don't have some sort of influence over their decision. If I'm wrong, then fair enough.

I just thought Brexit was supposed to put British farming/fishing/manufacturing in first place.

It's possibly a one off, but where a big set up like Warbies lead, others tend to follow.

I saw it as an opportunity to put Britain's wellbeing first.

Hopefully manufacturing will increase; we've seen in stark terms what can happen with a shortage in certain areas.

As for farming; the potential to import inferior food has increased post Brexit; however the government has continually reiterated the point that food standards won't be reduced, but will be strengthened- which will help producers here.

The case of warbies seems more about price specifically; which, at the moment farmers may struggle to compete with. As for tariffs, currently nothing has changed remember, and until deals are done we don't know what they may be.

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3 minutes ago, MickyD said:

I also prefer a warbys white for bacon butties. Small independent bakers’ white uncut loaves taste miles better on the day of purchase but are fucked in a very short time period. Warbys, on the other hand, manage to produce a loaf that’s still good a couple of days after the bbe date.

A continental breakfast of cheese and ham on a fresh baguette in Toulouse was the tastiest butty i've ever made.

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2 minutes ago, leigh white said:

A continental breakfast of cheese and ham on a fresh baguette in Toulouse was the tastiest butty i've ever made.

Agreed but save the fresh baguette for tomorrow’s breakfast and it’s like eating a pebble. Warbys will still be good in a week.

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Just now, MickyD said:

Agreed but save the fresh baguette for tomorrow’s breakfast and it’s like eating a pebble. Warbys will still be good in a week.

Correct, got to be eaten on the same day.

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What do they put in it to make it last so long? Seems unnatural, but them I’m not French so fuck going to the bakery twice a day.

Actually Iceland do a fab Tiger loaf, and Sainsbury’s do some nice, thick whole meal stuff which is great for toast and peanut butter.

Ive not had breakfast today.....

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2 hours ago, Tonge moor green jacket said:

Or, we left the EU to allow greater access to deals from all over the world?

 

And this was the main point of Brexit (apparently), so people should be pleased that we're free to go for the lowest prices, no way should we be protecting our own farmers and keeping business/orders here, if it's going to be an extra cost to the consumer.I think even the most ardent Brexiteer knows that leaving the EU is going to decimate the UK farming industry with regards to commodity crops and livestock. As a population, we always strive for the lowest cost - it's very romantic and idealistic to say "well all buy British, it'll be great" but ultimately people will still vote with their wallets, and sad but true, there is a reason why the likes of Primark, B&M and Poundland are thriving. I think we know that UK farmers are not really going to be able to compete for large volumes of grain, so they'll just have to diversify and find something else to do to make a living, especially as they'll no longer be getting EU subsidies.

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41 minutes ago, Spider said:

My original point really was that Britain's biggest breadmaker (I think) are going abroad for a product that's being grown a few miles from the bakery.

I'm guessing here and can't be bothered looking, but I'd be surprised if Brexit & tariffs being lifted don't have some sort of influence over their decision. If I'm wrong, then fair enough.

I just thought Brexit was supposed to put British farming/fishing/manufacturing in first place.

It's possibly a one off, but where a big set up like Warbies lead, others tend to follow.

Brexit wasn’t about that, more about Britain trading freely around the world, which this seems like an example?

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Just now, boltondiver said:

Brexit wasn’t about that, more about Britain trading freely around the world, which this seems like an example?

Well now, you're seeing an example.

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1 minute ago, boltondiver said:

Brexit wasn’t about that, more about Britain trading freely around the world, which this seems like an example?

would Warbies not have been able to do this before to the same degree / cost?

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3 minutes ago, ZicoKelly said:

would Warbies not have been able to do this before to the same degree / cost?

Sure, but my point is that it isn’t about reverting to “Little Britain”

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Mounts will have all the answers 

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4 minutes ago, ZicoKelly said:

would Warbies not have been able to do this before to the same degree / cost?

A quick look, but I think the EU imposes a tariff of around 40%~50% on imported grains, to protect EU farmers.......I don't know, but now that we've left, can we choose not to have any tariffs in place, so we can buy cheaper grain, and reduce the cost of a loaf?  

I don't know if Warbies can buy grain cheaper today, with regards to tariffs, than they could a year ago, or if we still have to stick the the EU rules for a while longer

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12 minutes ago, Sweep said:

A quick look, but I think the EU imposes a tariff of around 40%~50% on imported grains, to protect EU farmers.......I don't know, but now that we've left, can we choose not to have any tariffs in place, so we can buy cheaper grain, and reduce the cost of a loaf?  

I don't know if Warbies can buy grain cheaper today, with regards to tariffs, than they could a year ago, or if we still have to stick the the EU rules for a while longer

We were in the EU when the UK government got shipments of imported cheap coal from all over the world so i can't see any difference.

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