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Wanderers Ways. Neil Thompson 1961-2021

Our Nat.


leigh white
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4 hours ago, jayjayoghani said:

Interesting they use the word soccer in 1953

It’s a common misconception that it’s an Americanism. I’m sure @MalcolmWwill correct me if I’m wrong, but it was in common use since the early 1900s (if not earlier) to avoid confusion with rugby, which was presumably known as football in certain areas, and still is in the rugby league areas of Australia.

Fairly sure I’m correct in thinking that it was along those lines that a lot of football clubs in the north (Huddersfield Town, Bradford City, Hull City, Leeds United, Wigan Athletic and presumably others) are ‘AFC’ (as in association football) rather than plain old FC.  

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1 hour ago, Leyther_Matt said:

It’s a common misconception that it’s an Americanism. I’m sure @MalcolmWwill correct me if I’m wrong, but it was in common use since the early 1900s (if not earlier) to avoid confusion with rugby, which was presumably known as football in certain areas, and still is in the rugby league areas of Australia.

Fairly sure I’m correct in thinking that it was along those lines that a lot of football clubs in the north (Huddersfield Town, Bradford City, Hull City, Leeds United, Wigan Athletic and presumably others) are ‘AFC’ (as in association football) rather than plain old FC.  

I knew the etymology of the word too.

I don't know if it's an urban myth but the word Soccer came about because the word Association wouldn't fit on the plaque outside Football HQ. So they abbreviated it to Assoc.

Yes, the word football is all encompassing, but soccer (technically Association) is actually more definitive and accurate. It's our word the world is using.

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1 hour ago, Leyther_Matt said:

It’s a common misconception that it’s an Americanism. I’m sure @MalcolmWwill correct me if I’m wrong, but it was in common use since the early 1900s (if not earlier) to avoid confusion with rugby, which was presumably known as football in certain areas, and still is in the rugby league areas of Australia.

Fairly sure I’m correct in thinking that it was along those lines that a lot of football clubs in the north (Huddersfield Town, Bradford City, Hull City, Leeds United, Wigan Athletic and presumably others) are ‘AFC’ (as in association football) rather than plain old FC.  

I reckon you are more or less right - seen it in 1890s articles for sure- often spelt as Socker - back of my mind think it might have originally been a slang word used by university teams  ? 

 

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3 hours ago, bwfc2003 said:

Soccer is a term that really gets on my tits - but not as much as people - usually women - referring to the beautiful game as "Footy" 

Generally by people who don't follow the game, like the generic office bloke trying to make small talk "did you see the footy last night?"

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12 hours ago, jayjayoghani said:

Interesting they use the word soccer in 1953

Not really mate. The Americans had truncated the word 'Association' well before 1953. A painful result for England in the 1950 WC Finals proved that.

One of the best headlines ever though was 'USA beats England 1-1'.

Great post LW.

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8 hours ago, Leyther_Matt said:

It’s a common misconception that it’s an Americanism. I’m sure @MalcolmWwill correct me if I’m wrong, but it was in common use since the early 1900s (if not earlier) to avoid confusion with rugby, which was presumably known as football in certain areas, and still is in the rugby league areas of Australia.

Fairly sure I’m correct in thinking that it was along those lines that a lot of football clubs in the north (Huddersfield Town, Bradford City, Hull City, Leeds United, Wigan Athletic and presumably others) are ‘AFC’ (as in association football) rather than plain old FC.  

I'm from Warrington, and as kids we played soccer or rugby (by which I mean league).

The clubs you name have an interesting history and all need to be distinguished from RFC.

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, Leyther_Matt said:

It’s a common misconception that it’s an Americanism.

Every days a school day. You are correct.

Charles Wreford somebody or other. The twat.

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38 minutes ago, bwfcuk said:

Big mate of Frank Worthington..

And how the terrace song, “We all agree, Frankie Worthy is magic!” started in homage to Bill Maynard’s catchphrase, “Magic, our Maurice.”

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3 hours ago, MickyD said:

And how the terrace song, “We all agree, Frankie Worthy is magic!” started in homage to Bill Maynard’s catchphrase, “Magic, our Maurice.”

I seem to remember the Burnden Paddock on that day singing  “who the fucking hell is that”  to Bill Maynard in front of the Manny Road End.   We didn’t have a clue to who he was.

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3 hours ago, Breightmet Boy said:

Reckoned he wasn’t a football fan, just a huge Frankie Worthy fan

He wrote the foreword for Frank's autobiography "One Hump or Two?" A very entertainig read if you can get a copy.

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11 hours ago, Mannyroader said:

He wrote the foreword for Frank's autobiography "One Hump or Two?" A very entertainig read if you can get a copy.

And if you enjoy reading more about his sexual exploits than his football prowess. 

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